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Resume Quiz Questions #1 - The Answers In Detail
If you find yourself here without having had the opportunity to take the quiz, first - go to Resume Questions Quiz - and see how you do!

Ready for another quiz? Try the Interview Questions Quiz  or the Job Search Networking Quiz.

Question 1:  A resume is...

A) An autobiography of one's career life and professional experiences in order to secure employment.

...Incorrect; on two levels: 1) a resume rarely secures employment. Its sole purpose is to secure interviews, and 2) this should not be taken as an opportunity to create an autobiography of one's career life. Your reader wants to know what you have to contribute, and is much less interested in who you are and what you hope to gain from the experience. Therefore, the resume document needs to be focused on meeting the needs of the reader (hiring manager) rather than the needs of the writer (job candidate).

B) A detailed listing of a job candidate's skills, experiences, responsibilities and achievements as these relate to the position and company being targeted.

...This is the best answer. When writing a resume, the focus of the document needs to be on the skills, experiences, responsibilities and achievements most directly relevant and valuable to the position and company being targeted. This is writing with the reader in mind.

C) A complete listing of an individual's education, work experience and professional training.

...Incorrect: While this may sound correct, a complete listing of information not relevant to the position or company being targeted has little or no value for your reader. In addition, your reader is most interested in that information which is most current (the most recent 10-15 years). Therefore, while your experience and achievements in 1970 may be impressive, they may have little value in today's market, particularly if you have nothing recent to add.
 


Question 2:  The purpose of a resume is to...

A) Establish a candidate's qualifications for a position - in order to secure an interview.

...This is the best answer. The sole purpose of the resume is to generate enough interest for the reader to feel compelled to invite the candidate for an interview. To achieve this result, the resume must effectively qualify the candidate for the position and company being targeted.

B) Establish a candidate's qualifications for a position - in order to secure employment.

...Incorrect: A resume, alone, will rarely secure employment. The resume's sole purpose is to secure interviews.

C) Establish a candidate's qualifications for a position - in order to eliminate the competition.

....Incorrect: While a focused, well-written resume may help place a candidate in the running for a position, a resume, alone, will rarely eliminate all other competition.
 


Question 3:  The length of a resume must be...

A) One page, no longer.

...Incorrect: While a one-page resume may be sufficient for certain job candidates, the one-page rule no longer exists. For those who require two pages in order to effectively document relevant history and achievements, trying to get this information on to a one-page format may reduce the final document's value, readability and effectiveness.

B) Two pages, no longer.

...Incorrect: While a two-page resume may be sufficient for certain job candidates, for those who would be better served with a one-page document, or for those who require more extensive documentation in order to include information vital to the reader, such as certain individuals in the medical or academic industries, a two-page resume may be a poor choice.

C) Whatever number of pages is necessary to qualify the candidate.

...This is the best answer.  The best guide regarding length is to: 1) include all information that is directly relevant and valuable to the position and company being targeted, and 2) leave everything else off.

 

For some job candidates this is best achieved within a one-page document. For others, two pages is required. And for some, a more detailed document is the more effective choice. However, keep in mind that your reader is going to invest a limited amount of time in the reading of your document. In fact, most resumes only receive an initial "reading" time of 15 seconds, or less. Therefore, if you present a three-page document when a two-page document would suffice, or you draw out your information into two pages when a one-page resume would suffice, you may leave your reader wondering if you are able to state your case and qualifications in a succinct manner, or you may lose your reader's interest long before he or she has had the opportunity to appreciate all you truly have to offer. Be considerate of your reader's time.
 


Question 4:  The most important information on my resume is...

A) Job experience and education.

...Incorrect: while this information is vital, your reader must know how to contact you in order to schedule an interview.

B) Contact information.

...This is the best answer. When all is said and done, how to contact you is the most important information in your resume, therefore, make certain this information is easy to locate, read and reference at a glance. This may feel like a trick question, but hundreds of resumes are submitted each year containing incorrect, inadequate or poorly presented contact information, taking candidates who would otherwise be considered serious contenders out of the job search game.

C) Achievements.

...Incorrect: while this information is vital, your reader must know how to contact you in order to schedule an interview.
 


Question 5:  It's okay to exaggerate information on my resume when...

A) I'm writing about older, less important positions and need to make my career path more logical.

...Incorrect: any deception in the resume can result in the removal of a candidate's opportunity for a position, or dismissal from a position he or she has accepted. Simply put: don't lie. It's not worth it.

B) I was shy of completing a degree by only a few credits - and a degree is a requirement of the position.

...Incorrect: any deception in the resume can result in the removal of a candidate's opportunity for a position, or dismissal from a position he or she has accepted. Simply put: don't lie. It's not worth it. Just check out RadioShack CEO resigns in resume flap. Edmondson admits misstating academic record, leaves after less than a year on the job - from CCNMoney.com.

C) It's never okay to exaggerate information in a resume.

...This is the best answer. If the information in your resume won't hold up under a detailed background investigation, you're in trouble. Simply put, don't lie or exaggerate your information in your resume. It's not worth it.
 


Question 6:  When writing my resume, my main focus should be on...

A) Who will be reading my resume.

...This is the best answer. When we write anything, the focus should always be on the person who will be reading our document. In this case, the targeted reader of a resume is usually a hiring manager or potential employer. Keeping this reader in focus, and writing for his or her benefit, will enable you to create and deliver a more effective and productive resume presentation.

B) Presenting my best skills, experiences and achievements in priority.

...Incorrect: Although this is important, and should be one of the critical factors you consider when writing your resume, without keeping your targeted reader in mind, and understanding the information he or she most wants to secure from potential candidates, it may be difficult to know which skills, experience and achievements are "best."

C) The readability and visual presentation of my document.

...Incorrect: While the readability and visual presentation of your document is extremely important, understanding who will be reading your document, and knowing what information will be most valuable and relevant to this targeted reader, should remain your top focus and priority when writing your resume.
 


Question 7:  When submitting my resume to a job advertisement, I need to make certain that...

A) I provide as many options for retrieving my resume as possible (ASCII, PDF, Word processed document, etc.).

...Incorrect: It's a great idea to have your resume in the various formats needed for an effective job search, but it's more important to know which document your recipient requires.

B) I follow the directions of the ad explicitly.

...This is the best answer. The ad should tell you in what format the resume is to be submitted, including file type (Word, ASCII, PDF) and transmission requirements (hardcopy, fax, via e-mail). Failing to follow the directions of an ad can lead to the submission of a document that the recipient can not access (for example, submitting a WordPerfect file to a recipient who doesn't have the software requirements necessary to open, view or print this type of document, when the ad explicitly stated that all resumes were to be submitted as MS Word attachments), or in a format that the recipient has clearly prohibited. For example, if an states, "No faxed submissions," and you fax your resume, then you've wasted both your time and your recipient's resources. Follow the directions of the ad, explicitly.

C) I secure the name of the hiring manager or decision maker.

...Incorrect: It's a good idea to secure the name of the targeted reader of your cover letter and resume, but it's more important to follow the directions of the ad to the letter.
 


Question 8:  When salary history is required in an ad, I should...

A) Ignore the request. This information may damage my ability to compete for the position.

...Incorrect: While providing salary history may diminish your ability to compete for a position or to effectively negotiate compensation later in the process, if an ad states that "only those resume submissions including salary history will be considered," it's important to recognize and respond to the request if you're sincerely interested in the position. Ignoring the request may indicate that you are unable or unwilling to following directions, or that your salary history is questionable.

B) Include this information in its own document and submit it with my resume.

...This is the best answer. For ads that request salary history or indicate that only those submissions including salary history information will be considered, it's important to address and answer the request. This is best achieved by creating a separate salary history document.

C) Include this information in the cover letter.

...Incorrect: Use the cover letter as your introduction and enticement to encourage your reader to turn to your resume with real interest. Keep salary history separate from both the cover letter and resume information, by creating an individual document to address this particular history. See "B," above.
 


Question 9:  When salary requirements are requested, I should...

A) Address this in my resume and provide a specific salary amount.

...Incorrect: The resume is the wrong place for this type of information, and providing a set or specific salary amount will substantially reduce your ability to effectively negotiate salary, later.

B) Ignore the request. Salary requirements are best discussed at the interview stage.

...Incorrect: While it's true that salary is best discussed at the interview stage - where the job candidate has the opportunity to learn the full criteria of the position and to address this criteria with his or her unique skills, experience and abilities - ignoring this request may indicate to your recipient that you are unable or unwilling to follow directions, or that your salary requirements may be unreasonable or inflexible.

C) Address this in my cover letter by providing a salary range or by indicating that salary is negotiable.

...This is the best answer. Providing a salary range leaves room for negotiation. It's wise, therefore, to do your homework on salary rates for your location, field and industry (see salary calculators) prior to engaging in a job search. Another good option is to address the question without quite answering it, "Salary is fully negotiable," which shows that you recognize the request and are willing to discuss the issue at interview.
 


Question 10:  Certain personal information needs to be included in the resume, such as...

A) My name and contact information.

...This is the best answer. It's important that the reader of your resume (usually a hiring manager or potential employer) knows who you are (your name) and how to contact you.

 

It is, however, illegal under the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) regulations for potential employers to inquire about a job candidate's age, marital status, religious beliefs, number of dependents, and other specific personal information. Therefore, it's a good idea for job candidates and potential employers (including those who interview job candidates) to understand what is permitted and to become very familiar with potential discrimination issues under the EEOC. Worth your review: Equal Employment Opportunity Laws

B) My name, contact information and date of birth.

...Incorrect: A potential employer in the United States is restricted from inquiring about a job candidate's age. See answer "A," above.

C) My name, contact information, date of birth and number of dependents.

...Incorrect: A potential employer in the United States is restricted from inquiring about a job candidate's age or number of dependents. See answer "A," above.
 


Question 11:  A potential employer is permitted to ask me the date(s) of my _____________________ graduation, and, therefore, I should include this/these date(s) on my resume.

A) high school.

...Incorrect: Providing the date of graduation from high school allows a potential employer to determine a candidate's age, which can be considered discriminatory under U.S. EEOC regulations.

B) high school and college.

...Incorrect: Providing the date of graduation from high school allows a potential employer to determine a candidate's age, which can be considered discriminatory under U.S. EEOC regulations.

C) college.

...This is the best answer. Because college can be completed at any stage of a job candidate's life, the date of college graduation is not necessarily indicative of a candidate's age. Potential employers are permitted to ask for college graduation dates, and this information is often included when performing candidate background checks and verification of degrees.
 


Question 12:  Posting my resume on a job search database online will make my resume available to:

A) Potential employers.

...Incorrect: While this may be true, it's important to understand that others may have access to your resume and information, as well - including your current employer.

B) Only those ads to which I respond.

...Incorrect: Once your resume is uploaded into an online database, you have very limited control (if any) regarding who will be able to access your resume and information - including your current employer.

C) Almost anyone, including my current employer.

...This is the best answer. When you include your resume in an online database, you essentially make your document and information available to anyone who can access the database, including your current employer. See:

Privacy issues for online job seekers:
Documents Reveal Serious Job Seeker Resume Privacy Violations, by Pam Dixon - Privacy Rights Clearinghouse
Fact Sheet 25: Privacy Tips for Online Job Seekers, by Pam Dixon - Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.


Ready for another quiz? Try the Interview Questions Quiz  or the Job Search Networking Quiz.

Should I Hire a Professional Resume Writer?  /  1st-Writer.com Services

See more articles on job hunting

Good luck in your job search! Sue Campbell Jones, 1st-Writer.com - over 15 years experience helping clients achieve their career and business goals. Feel free to e-mail me with any questions you may have. I'll be glad to help!

1st-Writer.com P.O. Box 1128, Keystone Heights, FL 32656-1128 (904) 248-2493   E-mail Sue Campbell Jones


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