1st-Writer.com Home PageSue Campbell offers 15 years experience as a professional resume writer and marketing consultant helping clients achieve their career, business, and marketing goals

1st-Writer Home  |  Resume Services  |  Career Resources  |  Job Search Articles  |  Job Sites  |  About Sue Campbell Jones

Student Center  |  Site Map  |  Resume Basics  |  Resignation Letter  |  Salary Requirements & Salary History

1st-Writer Home

Resume Services

Career Resources

Job Sites -

* Jobs By Industry
* Jobs By State

Job Hunting Articles

Student Center

Electronic Formats

Professional Bios

Web Page Design

About Sue Campbell Jones

Client Comments

Take A Break!

Site Map

Privacy Policy

See why I use these funny shoes throughout my site

See why I use these funny tennis shoes throughout my site.

"If we choose to be no more than clods of clay, then we shall be used as clods of clay for braver feet to tread on." - Marie Corelli

Marketing Services
Small business marketing plans,  newsletters, Web page documents, brochures, copyediting, graphic ads (online and print mediums) and more.
If you need it created,
1st-Writer can help.

"If you don't feel like the most important client I've ever worked for, then I haven't done my job."
~Sue Campbell Jones

 

 

Resume Examples - and the different file formats explained
by Sue Campbell Jones, 1st-Writer.com

See various design formats, such as Reverse Chronological, Functional and Mixed.

Download Adobe Reader for FREE the PDF files below require the Adobe® Reader® to open and view - if you don't already have Adobe® Reader® on your system, you can download it for FREE.

Want to have your resume in these electronic formats?


Word Processor Resume File - MS Word

A Word Processed Resume is created in a word processing software program, such as Microsoft Word or WordPerfect. The following examples are in PDF format (retaining all the original format and design of a Word document) for online viewing.

Example MS Word Resume - two page design (opens in PDF)
Example MS Word Resume - two page design (opens in PDF)

Example MS Word Resume - one page design (opens in PDF)
Example MS Word Resume - one page design (opens in PDF)

Example MS Word Resume - one page design
(opens in PDF)
- Example High School Graduate Resume - (PDF file)
- Example College Graduate Resume - (PDF file)

About Word Processed Resumes

Your document's original creation will probably begin in a word processing software program.

Using word processing software allows a great amount of control and creativity, and has a huge impact on your document's final appearance.

Your word processed resume is usually the first choice for printing and use in hardcopy submissions.

The drawback to submitting a word processed resume online (submitting as an attached file) is that it can be difficult to know what software your recipient has on his or her computer system. Without the appropriate software installed, your recipient may not be able to open, download, view, read or print your document.

Many ads will request that online resume submissions be in compliance to a particular word processing software program, such as Microsoft Word or WordPerfect. In the event that the word processing software required is different from what you've used to create your resume, you still have options available for submitting an online document that your recipient will be able to access. For example, you can:

  • Convert your resume to PDF and submit your resume as an attached PDF file

  • Convert your resume to ASCII and submit your resume as an attached "Text Only" document

  • Copy and paste your resume into the body of an e-mail message

  • Direct your recipient to your Resume Web page

  • Or all of the above

When To Use A Word Processed Resume

You'll use your word processed resume file for hardcopy submissions of your resume (snail mail).

You'll use your word processed resume as an attached file with e-mail submissions.

And you'll use your word processed resume for upload to resume database sites that allow the submission of word processed documents.

(Back to top...)


HTML or Resume Web Page

Want your own Resume Web page?

About HTML Resumes

An HTML resume is formatted for posting on the World Wide Web. One of the positive aspects of a resume Web page, from a potential employer's point-of-view, is that it doesn't require your recipient to download a file and reduces the risk of virus transmission. It can be read, printed (although it won't print quite as cleanly as a word processed file), or saved to a favorites folder. The Resume Web page also provides an easy avenue for response, because the candidate's e-mail address can be hyperlinked (clicking on the e-mail address will bring up an e-mail creation window).

The HTML resume permits greater layout and formatting options than an ASCII resume (more attractive), but somewhat less than a word processed resume.

The HTML resume provides a quick and convenient option for getting your resume in front of potential employers and companies of interest.

When To Use An HTML or Resume Web Page

You'll use your resume Web page by including the URL (Web site address) in all your online and print correspondence or communications with potential employers and companies of interest. For example, added to an ASCII file as part of your contact information, it can offer your recipient another option for viewing your document - with greater layout and format than the ASCII resume offers. As part of your e-mail signature, it can encourage recipient's to view your resume without requiring your reader to download a file.

When transferring a resume to the Internet, what are some problems to look out for?

In most cases, the resume that ends up on the Internet begins its life as a word-processed document. Most word processing software have the ability to "save as" or "convert" a file to both ASCII and HTML formats. Problems arise when the resulting converted files are posted to the Internet "as is." Both formats need reformatting before they're ready for the Net. If this isn't done properly, the resulting presentation won't look its best and might not be readable at all.

Once a word-processed file is converted to ASCII text, it loses all high level formatting. All tabs, bold, underlining, italics, bullets, etc. will be gone. It must be edited to make what's left as attractive (and readable) as possible.

Once a word-processed file is converted to HTML, unlike the ASCII file, it still retains most of its high level formatting. But since HTML code is not nearly as rich in formatting features as word processing applications, it will lose some of its formatting which will need to be corrected before it's ready to take on its new life as a Web page. This can be done with the word processor that was used to create the original file. Alternatively, it can be imported into FrontPage or one of the other HTML editors for this final preparation. During the final preparation step, other features can be added to the file. These include the addition of a hyperlink for your e-mail address, adding a META tag for "keywords" and a META tag for "page description" at the top of the page so search engine robots can pick them up and index them (if confidentiality isn't an issue). Other features that can be easily added at this time include a colored or graphic background and different font colors.

(Back to top...)


ASCII, Text Only, or Scannable Resume

An actual "ASCII Resume" is in text only format and is normally submitted as an attached .txt file or is copied and pasted from a .txt file into the body of an e-mail message. The following examples of "Plain Text" resumes are in HTML (Web page) or PDF format for online viewing.

 

Example of ASCII. Plain Text or Scannable Resume (Web page)

Another example of an ASCII, Plain Text or Scannable Resume (Web page)
ASCII or Plain Text Resume in the body of an E-mail Message (Web page)

Example of ASCII, Plain Text or Scannable Resume (PDF file) - long line lengths, for mediums that allow line wrapping
Example of ASCII, Plain Text or Scannable Resume (PDF file) - short line lengths with some formatting for use in mediums (such as some of the online resume sites that require the use of their box forms) that don't allow line wrapping.

Another example of an ASCII, Plain Text or Scannable Resume (PDF file)

ASCII or Plain Text Resume in the body of an E-mail Message (PDF file)

Download Adobe Reader for FREE the PDF files above require the Adobe® Reader® to open and view - if you don't already have  Adobe® Reader® on your system, you can download it for FREE.

About ASCII (text only) Resumes

ASCII resumes are plain text files that potential employers like because: 1) they're a smaller file to download and store, 2) they have a lower risk of virus transmission, and 3) they can be easily scanned into company database systems (scannable resume).

An ASCII resume is void of highlighting effects such as processed bullets (asterisks work), underlining, italics and bolding. The use of adequate white space is important in creating an effective ASCII resume, particularly when you consider that an ASCII resume will not only be "read" by a scanner, but hopefully by a human eye as well.

To create an ASCII version of your resume, simply pull up your resume in the word processing program from which it was created (such as Microsoft Word), click on "Save As..." and choose "Plain Text." This will give your document a .txt extension.

Next, open the text document in a plain text viewer, such as Notepad. From here, you'll want to "clean up" your document by adding white space and removing any remaining formatting blips (such as bullets that have turned into asterisks - you can leave them, but they no longer serve a function). Save your file. This should give you an ASCII resume with long line lengths like the ASCII resume example above.

Next, reduce your right margin so that it allows no more than 65 characters per line (including spaces) before the line wraps. You'll want to place a hard return after each of these lines to create an ASCII resume with short line restrictions. Save this file under a different name. This file is necessary for those online formats that don't permit line wrapping, such as the second ASCII resume example above.

To maximize scan-ability:

  1. Use white or light-colored 8-1/2 x 11 paper, printed on one side only.

  2. Provide laser printer original or high quality photocopy.

  3. Don't fold or staple.

  4. Use a standard typeface such as Helvetica, Arial, or Times New Roman.

  5. Use a font size of 11 to 14 points.

  6. Don't condense spacing so that characters touch each other.

  7. Refrain from using italics and underlining.

  8. Avoid vertical and horizontal lines, graphics, and boxes.

  9. Avoid multi-column formats.

  10. Use plenty of white space between groups of information.

Job candidates often don't like ASCII resumes because of the limited design and layout capabilities (they're "plain" text). ASCII resumes simply aren't as attractive as word processed or HTML resumes. However, the ASCII resume is a very useful file for submission of a resume document via e-mail (either as an attached file or as part of the body of an e-mail message), for uploading into online resume database sites (see a list of such sites on the Career Resources page), and for submission to ads that require ASCII or "Text Only" resume submissions.

When to Use An ASCII or Scannable Resume

You'll use an ASCII resume whenever an ad (online or in print) requires an "ASCII," "Text Only," or "Plain Text" submission, or for companies that request a "scannable resume."

You'll use the ASCII resume to copy and paste your information into an e-mail message (see example) for all ads that state "No file attachments," or as a way to bypass Spam filters that will delete all incoming e-mails with attachments.

You'll use the ASCII resume as a file attachment when submitting your resume online but when uncertain of your recipient's software or operating system, since an ASCII file can be read cleanly across all platforms (hopefully you'll include other options for accessing your resume, too, such as a resume Web page).

And you'll use your ASCII resume to copy and paste your information into online resume databases (see Career Resources for a list of such sites).

(Back to top...)


PDF Resume

Example of an MS Word Resume in PDF
Example of an ASCII Resume in PDF

Download Adobe Reader for FREE the PDF files above require the Adobe® Reader® to open and view - if you don't already have  Adobe® Reader® on your system, you can download it for FREE.

About PDF Resumes

PDF stands for "Portable Document Format," and is commonly used on the Internet for the secure and reliable distribution and exchange of electronic documents and forms. PDF is a universal file format that preserves the fonts, images, graphics, and layout of any source document, regardless of the application and platform used to create it. Therefore, a resume created in Microsoft Word, for example, and saved in PDF will retain all of its original layout, format and design - even if your recipient doesn't have Microsoft Word installed on his or her computer. PDF files require the use of the free Adobe® Reader® to open, view and print.

In order to edit an unprotected PDF file, Adobe® Acrobat® software is required. Be wary of resume services that only provide a resume in this format, unless you have access to Adobe® Acrobat®.

When To Use A PDF Resume

You'll use your PDF resume to post a non-HTML document on the Internet as a Web page, retaining all of its original, word processed design.

You'll use your PDF resume as a file attachment when uncertain of your recipients' software or operating system requirements, since the majority of Internet users have the Adobe® Reader® software installed.

(Back to top...)

Should I Hire a Professional Resume Writer?  /  1st-Writer.com Services

See more articles on job hunting

For Information on 1st-Writer.com's services, or to answer any questions you may have, please feel free to E-mail Sue Campbell Jones. I'll be glad to help. Over 18 years experience as a professional resume writer and career strategist.


1st-Writer.com P.O. Box 1128, Keystone Heights, FL 32656-1128 (904) 248-2493   E-mail Sue Campbell Jones

Home   |   Resume Services   |   Marketing Services   |   Career Resources  |  Privacy Policy
Professional Bios   |   Web Design   |   Job Search Articles   |   About Sue Campbell Jones

Site Map   |  Student Center  |  Job Sites by Industry  |  Job Sites by StateSue Campbell offers over 15 years experience as a professional resume writer and career strategist helping clients achieve their career, business and marketing goals

Copyright©1996-2012 Sue Campbell Jones - All rights reserved
This page last updated: 10/14/2013